Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

Ella Mulligan '19, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Indonesia is a country riddled with crime and drug trafficking issues.  Although the country has some of the harshest drug laws in the world, the illegal drug user population in 2014 was still 4.1 million people, a large portion of the population. In Indonesia, the smuggling of illegal drugs is worthy of the death penalty, and even just using those drugs can send an individual to prison for several years. However, some prisoners have been escaping from their cells with the help of corrupt prison guards.  

The guards of the prisons have allegedly been allowing prisoners, even those on death row, to escape if they’re willing to pay a significant amount of money in return. There are even reports that say that the guards not only release prisoners, but trade drugs to the prisoners on the prison islands.  Fortunately, Indonesia has expressed a potential solution to the problem.  The head of the country’s anti-drug agency has suggested replacing human guards with crocodiles, as crocodiles cannot be bribed with money.

The plan is simple: all convicted drug traffickers are to be sent to a prison island, away from corrupt guards and drug users, and to be guarded by the ferocious animals.  If the prisoners tried to escape, they would be eaten by the crocodiles, which would certainly sway other convicts from attempting to escape. In addition, the plan apparently does not violate human rights at all since the crocodile is the one doing the killing, not another person.  Even though the plan is still in its preliminary stages, the head of the Indonesian anti-drug agency, Budi Wases, has declared his intention to hunt down the most ferocious crocodiles in the country, and station them around the island.  It has been said that Waseso wants to add tigers and piranhas to the mix of wildlife to guard the island.

Although this plan has not been put into effect, Indonesian anti-drug officials are giving the idea some serious consideration.  The hope is that by keeping the death row convicts separated from the corrupt prison guards and the regular prisoners to stop them from joining gangs, that there will be less prison breaks overall with the prisoners.   

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Showcase

    Freshman Tips

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Catholic

    Simple Service: Ideas to get your Christian Service Hours done quickly

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    ASB Update

    ASB Update: August 2017

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Featured Sports Story

    Oregon Bound: Spencer Petras ’18 on his commitment to Oregon State

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    News

    The Olympics: The Road to South Korea

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Showcase

    #JustMCThings

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Featured Sports Story

    Varsity Wrestling: A Small But Tight-Knit Brotherhood

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Showcase

    Spotlight on Varsity Girls Basketball

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Featured Sports Story

    Crocs-with-Socks: Harvard Football Commit Sean McKeogh

  • Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons

    Featured Sports Story

    Class of 2017 D1 Commits Reflect on Their Journeys

Crocodiles to Guard Indonesian Prisons